The Future of Research Communications and e-Scholarship

FSCI 2022

Collaboration for Action: Sharing Knowledge Across Boundaries

FORCE11 Scholarly Communication Institute in partnership with UCLA Library

Course List with Abstracts

Modified: Thu, 14 Jul 2022 23:16:12 +0000
Published: 14 Jul 2022

  • Scroll down to see the abstracts for each course


E01 – Prepare to Teach Open Science Through the Lens of the UNESCO Recommendation

Jennifer Miller, Tel Amiel, Geoffrey Cain 

Abstract: Would you like to teach a course in open science, one designed for easy course prep?

  • As a PI-led special topics course in your lab or department?
  • In Maymester or summer session for potential or incoming STEM graduate students?
  • For current/retired STEM practitioners and educators in a community college?

This course will be a workshop in which faculty prepare a proposal for a special topics course and/or begin preparation for a course that teaches open science through the lens of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science. 

An open syllabus and course materials have been developed through the UNESCO-sponsored program Open Education for a Better World (OE4BW). The course has been designed to incorporate open pedagogy, to be discussion-based, to adapt to flexible modalities, and to require minimal preparation. 

Course materials are openly licensed and available on Zenodo: https://zenodo.org/record/5823531

Audience: Researchers, librarians, faculty/scholars, administrators, doctoral students, job-market candidates and postdocs with an interest in teaching open science.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

8:00 – 10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 27

8:00 – 10:00 AM

Thursday, July 28

8:00 – 10:00 AM


E02 – Applying Strategic Doing, an Agile Strategy Discipline, to Build Collaborations Across Diverse Teams

Jeffrey Agnoli, Meris Mandernach Longmeier 

Abstract: Strategic Doing™ assists teams in answering four basic strategic questions using 10 simple rules. This method leverages a network approach to build collaboration, enhance trust, and produce measurable outcomes. Presenters will share how they apply these methods to build research and creative expression initiatives that enable strategic planning, ideation, and operations management. 

Participants will learn how to answer these four basic questions to develop a compelling strategy: 

  • What could we do?
  • What should we do?
  • What will we do?
  • What is our action plan? 

These concepts map to “the science of team science” competencies, including but not limited to: how to promote psychological safety and transparency; democratic prioritizing; clarifying roles and responsibilities; and supporting more productive teams.  

Audience: Researchers, librarians, faculty/scholars, administrators, technical support staff, interdisciplinary researchers, and those interested in supporting these types of teams.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

9:00 – 10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 27

9:00 – 10:30 AM

Thursday, July 28

9:00 – 10:30 AM


E03 – Open Access, Bibliodiversity and Research Assessment Reform Across Borders

Tom Olyhoek, Miho Funamori, Iryna Kuchma, Kathleen Shearer, Ivonne Lujano Vilchis 

Abstract: This year’s course has changed its focus away from last year’s focus on PlanS to spend more time discussing the developments of different aspects in scholarly communication that were set in motion by the continuing global rise of open access and open science. This will be done in three sessions on bibliodiversity and multilingualism; community governed infrastructures; and research assessment reform.

We will discuss  the publisher-dominated scholarly publishing system in the North – subscription and open access, maintained by publisher-controlled metrics and ranking – versus the community-controlled open access publishing system in Latin America and the society-based subscription system and governmental infrastructures in Japan and other Asian countries. Publishing in Africa is much less developed, but we will discuss steps that have been taken there toward a community-controlled infrastructure.

The current system promotes the communication of research in English because of the artificially imposed need to publish in highly ranked journals form the major Western publishers. Ranking and English language requirements are the major obstacles for more bibliodiversity. 

A community-controlled system for indexation of quality open access journals in all languages and without ranking would be able to increase bibliodiversity and equity in scholarly publishing globally. DOAJ is such an infrastructure and the criteria and policies of DOAJ will be discussed.

Another obstacle in getting a more equitable publishing and research system lies with the research community itself. Many researchers hold the belief that open access is of lesser quality and that their local-language journals are always inferior to Western English language journals. We will discuss the need for communication in the researcher’s own language, especially for the SSH disciplines,

In order to achieve more equity and diversity across borders, the current evaluation of research and researchers needs to be transformed. DORA has a crucial role in this process, as has the Plan S initiative, which has research evaluation reform as one of its major goals. 

In Europe there is the creation of a coalition for research assessment reform (https://ec.europa.eu/info/news/process-towards-agreement-reforming-research-assessment-2022-jan-18_en) in individual countries, universities, and research organizations that subscribed to the DORA principles are developing new ways of research assessment. 

The effects of Plan S are felt worldwide, but outside of Europe – i.e., in the United States, Africa and Asia – the outcome is not always what is wanted.

In African countries there is a wealth of local knowledge that could contribute to solving local and global problems. African open access journals and open repositories in English, French, Portuguese, and local languages play a crucial role in unlocking this hidden knowledge.

It requires a change of mindset from researchers in Africa and elsewhere as well as from policy makers worldwide in order to identify responsible research assessment from a uniquely African perspective and to set up standards for quality assurance and integrity in African research practices with open science as an underlying principle instead of trying to adhere to current  Western standards of journal ranking and research assessment. A number of organizations are working toward this goal in Africa, notably AJOL, ASREN, EIFL, UbuntuNet Alliance, WACREN, ASSAf, and TCC Africa-AfricArxiv. 

Audience: Researchers, librarians, faculty/scholars and publishers.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

7:00 – 9:00 AM

Wednesday, July 27

7:00 – 9:00 AM

Thursday, July 28

7:00 – 9:00 AM


E04 – Getting Attention and Bringing Others on Board: Applying Basics in Marketing and Communications to Advance Open Research 

Jennifer Gibson, Rowena Walton

Abstract: Getting the attention of faculty, students, decision-makers, and others and convincing them to break out of long-established habits to try something new is a defining aspect of work in scholarly communications. The future of open research is dependent on our ability to change behaviors. 

Putting compelling messages in front of the right audiences is a practiced art and science in marketing and communications. The world’s biggest brands are masters at convincing us that our shampoo is bad for our hair and that we need to buy more sugary soda.

Social marketing, which long precedes social media, is the application of commercial marketing principles and practices to effect social and behavioral change. The same systems for understanding an individual’s needs and pains, for communicating to them in their world, on their terms, and convincing them to attempt a change in behavior can be used to promoteC adoption of open research practices as well as purchases of bacon double cheeseburgers.

This course will explore the basics of marketing strategy and their application in the research environment – to advance open research or any other type of behavior change. 

Participants will learn how to:

  • Communicate powerfully by separating audiences according to their different interests.
  • Get the most out of an outreach program by prioritizing specific audiences.
  • Build a compelling offering by aligning the service with the audience’s needs and available choices.
  • Cut through the noise by creating messages in the audience’s voice.
  • Develop a comprehensive, impactful outreach program that gets attention from the right people.
  • Monitor the program and make regular improvements to try to increase impact.

Audience: Individuals with the responsibility to promote and advocate for open research practices in the academic community, targeting faculty, students, librarians, publishers, administrators, and disciplinary communities. These may include librarians, community managers, start-ups, publishing staffers, and others. 

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

7:00 – 8:30 AM

Wednesday, July 27

7:00 – 8:30 AM

Thursday, July 28

7:00 – 8:30 AM


E05 – Don’t Get Caught in the Publishing Trap: A Demonstration of the Scholarly Comms and Copyright Board Game Now Shifted Online

Dr. Jane Secker, Chris Morrison

Abstract: The Publishing Trap is a board game aimed at doctoral and early career researchers which covers the key copyright and licensing issues involved in academic publishing. It was released in 2016 as an open educational resource, and it influenced creation of a range of scholarly communications and research support games. 

The game follows the fortunes of four researchers who have to make decisions about how to communicate the outputs of their research. Participants play in teams, discussing these choices before the consequences of them are revealed. The game has the following learning outcomes:

  • To critique and assess the publication and communication choices available to academics at different stages in their career.
  • To compare the implications of open and more closed publishing routes.
  • To critically evaluate the relationship between knowledge, impact, and money in academic life.

The pandemic led us to adapt our board game to be a multiplayer game taught online in a virtual classroom, using an interactive powerpoint and break-out rooms to allow the teams to discuss their answers in each round of the game. 

In this course you will have a chance to play the first part of the game, which focuses on the choices early career researchers make in the following instances:

  • Depositing a PhD thesis on open access and licensing choices. 
  • Presenting at conferences and publishing in conference proceedings.
  • Publishing in journals and understanding issues such as green and gold open access.

We will also use the session to share some insights about how to run the game in your own institution and how learning about copyright in a more playful way can make a powerful advocacy point to your audience. The full resources to run both an online game and a board game are available from our website to download and adapt. 

Audience: Researchers, librarians, faculty/scholars, publishers, administrators, PhD students, early career researchers, and scholarly communications and research support staff.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

7:00 – 9:00 AM

Wednesday, July 27

7:00 – 9:00 AM

Thursday, July 28

7:00 – 9:00 AM


E06 – Making Biomedical Science Computable: Open Access Tools to Make Your Project FAIR 

Instructors: Joanne Dehnbostel, Dr. Amy Price, and  Khalid Shahin
Contributors: Dr. Mario Tristan and Dr. Brian Alper

Abstract: In this course you will learn to create a structured assessment of the risk of bias of a scientific research article and make it findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR) on the newly created Fast Evidence Interoperability Resource (FEvIR) platform. 

The data you generate will automatically create standardized modular computable resources for reuse in software that supports the Health Level Seven International (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard. FHIR is used for interoperability for electronic medical records. Learn how you can use the  FEvIR platform to create FAIR FHIR resources for biomedical research and journal articles. You will not need any software programing or computer coding skills. 

This course will train participants to create FHIR resources across three sessions:

Session 1: Learn the background of HL7 FHIR, EBMonFHIR, and COKA collaboratives and the basis of the FEvIR platform to leverage the power and reusability of FHIR resources in your own work. Learn about the FAIR principles to make your work findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. Create your first FHIR resource (without coding) to produce a citation for the research article you will assess. You will learn easy pathways to gather research materials from PubMed or ClinicalTrials.gov websites.

Session 2: Learn to perform a risk of bias assessment on your chosen scientific article using the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool (RoBAT). Continue to create your own FHIR resources on the FEvIR platform. Unite the resources you created in FHIR on your own FEvIR project page. Get feedback to help streamline your project. 

Session 3: Learn how to join our collaborative work groups to support the FHIR standard for scientific communication. Learn how to comment on and vote on vocabulary terms in development for the Scientific Evidence Code System (SEVCO).

At the end of this course, you will know how to help us change the way science is communicated. International volunteers collaborated and constructed methods to refine and implement standards for scientific communication in ways built upon the FHIR standard for healthcare records. Now you can use these tools for your own work. 

Are you creating a systematic review? This is a great place to gather references and create citation resources from PubMed. Create FHIR resources from a ClinicalTrials.gov study without re-entering the data. Create Risk of Bias assessments using RoBAT, which now includes profiles from ROB1, ROB2, ROBIS and other familiar workflows. 

Audience: This course is ideal for information professionals or researchers who wish to improve the quality of their research and/or who wish to start running trainings at their institutions.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

8:00 – 10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 27

8:00 – 10:00 AM

Thursday, July 28

8:00 – 10:00 AM


E07 – Analyzing Your Institution’s Publishing Output

Allison Langham-Putrow, Ana Enriquez

Abstract: Understanding institutional publishing output is crucial to scholarly communications work. This class will equip participants to analyze article publishing by authors at an institution.

After completing the course, participants will be able to

  • Gain an understanding of their institution’s publishing output, such as number of publications per year, open access status of the publications, major funders of the research, and estimates of how much funding might be spent toward article processing charges (APCs).
  • Think critically about institutional publishing data to make sustainable and values-driven scholarly communications decisions.

This course will build on open infrastructure, including Unpaywall and OpenRefine. We will provide examples of how to do analyses in both OpenRefine and Microsoft Excel. 

The course will consist of two parts. In the first, participants will learn how to build a dataset. We will provide lessons about downloading data from different sources: Web of Science, Scopus, and The Lens. (Web of Science and Scopus are subscription databases; The Lens is freely available.) 

In the second part of the course, participants will learn data analysis methods that can help answer questions such as:

  • Should you cancel or renew a subscription?
  • Who is funding your institution’s researchers?
  • Are your institution’s authors using an institutional repository?
  • Should you accept a publisher’s open access publishing offer?

Library agreements with publishers are at a crucial turning point, as they more and more often include OA publishing. By learning to do these analyses for themselves, participants will be better prepared to enter into negotiations with a publisher. The expertise developed through this course can make the uneven playing field of library-publisher negotiations slightly more even.

Course materials will be openly available. This will be a facilitated course taught by the authors.

Audience: Librarians, library and information studies students.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

8:00 – 11:00 AM

Wednesday, July 27

8:00 – 11:00 AM

Thursday, July 28

8:00 – 11:00 AM


E08 – Evaluating Open Access Journals: Moving from Provocative to Practical in Characterizing Journal Practices

Karen Gutzman, Annie Wescott

Abstract: In today’s scholarly publishing ecosystem, researchers, librarians, academic institutions, funders, and even publishers have difficulty in identifying and tracking journals that engage in practices ranging from fraudulent and deceptive to questionable and unethical. 

In this course, we will define these specious practices, avoiding the binary “predatory” and “legitimate” classification by exploring the nuances of journal practices and how these practices developed as unintended consequences of the current academic publishing model. We will investigate tools for evaluating journal quality and discuss relevant case studies that will provide helpful context. Finally, we will review recommendations for raising awareness and promoting good practices in scholarly communications. 

This course aims to prepare librarians and other support personnel to offer training and support for researchers in how to understand the norms in open access publishing and how to avoid deceptive or low-quality journals. We will cover useful tools for mitigating the likelihood of publishing in these journals and discuss steps to take to assist researchers who believe they may have published in such a journal. 

This course will take place over three hours with each hour containing a mixture of lecture and discussion based on a case study or investigation of a tool for evaluating journal quality. We encourage students to engage in discussions and share their own experiences.

Audience: Researchers, librarians, faculty/scholars, administrators.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

9:00 – 10:00 AM

Wednesday, July 27

9:00 – 10:00 AM

Thursday, July 28

9:00 – 10:00 AM


E09 – When Global is Local: Multilingualism, Diversity, and Representation in Digital Humanities and Humanidades Digitales

Gimena del Rio Riande, Jennifer Isasi 

Abstract: Academic publishing is one of the keystones of science. Articles, books, chapters, and proceedings build a scientific field. In this locus of competitive struggle (Bourdieu, 1966), language choice is no small issue. The examination of linguistic practices of scholars on a global level constitutes a privileged outlook onto the field’s inner logics and its global power relations. This course will focus on the practices and experiences of knowledge exchange in the so-called Global Digital Humanities, focusing on the possible exclusions and inequities related to multilingualism, diversity, and representation in academic publishing.

Openness and fast growth of information technology have contributed to reducing many injustices in knowledge dissemination. However, strategies for positively transforming and opening scholarly communication on a global scale in ways that eliminate systematic and biased understandings of participation and success are still needed. In this course we aim at debating on the use of languages for communicating science, publishing circuits (Beigel, 2014), the impact of assessment in linguistic choices, and the prevalence of the English-language as a lingua franca in academic publishing, together with claims of linguistic misrepresentation in journals, conferences, etc., in the Global Digital Humanities.

We know that Anglophone digital humanists generally don’t cite work conducted in other regions, much less if it is published in other languages. But how does one of the major sub-communities of the Digital Humanities, the Spanish-speaking Humanidades Digitales, fare in that respect? Are we publishing in our own languages when given the opportunity? And are we citing our language colleagues? Why is this happening (or not happening)?

We will offer use cases and reflections on issues regarding multilingualism, diversity, and representation. The emphasis will be on the local contexts and relevancies of participation and impact, including debates related to technologies and access. Theories related to the Latin American Open Access and Global Science experience and Global South studies will help as alternative ways of examining local and global questions about scholarly communication in the Digital Humanities and Humanidades Digitales.

This is the sixth edition of this FSCI course. Since 2017 we have been exploring different topics related to global inequities in scholarly communication. This is the first year we ground the discussion in the Digital Humanities field. The class will offer a mix of lecture and practical work, particularly information gathering and analysis. The emphasis will be on providing frameworks for critical episteme and considerations within which information can be gathered and understood rather than on “fact teaching.” We will encourage participants to engage reflectively with the material, bringing their own experiences to bear. 

Bibliographic References

  • Beigel, F. (2014). Publishing from the periphery: Structural heterogeneity and segmented circuits. The evaluation of scientific publications for tenure in Argentina’s CONICET. Current Sociology, 62(5), 743–765. https://doi.org/10.1177/0011392114533977
  • Bourdieu, P. (1971). Champ du pouvoir, champ intellectuel et habitus de classe. Scoliés, I.

Audience: Researchers, librarians, faculty/scholars, publishers, and technical support staff.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

7:00 – 8:00 AM

Wednesday, July 27

7:00 – 8:00 AM

Thursday, July 28

7:00 – 8:00 AM


L11 – Catalyzing Team Science: How to Forge a Team to Attack Complex Problems

Ronald Margolis

Abstract: Complex problems, particularly in the life and natural sciences, are characterized by increasingly complex and technically challenging approaches. Often it takes a cross- or trans-disciplinary approach to first understand and then solve such problems. To do so, teams of investigators drawn from several disciplines must come together to bring their separate, and sometimes overlapping, expertise to bear on the problem. 

One challenge is to assemble teams from all levels of the academy, from trainees (undergraduate and graduate students) and junior faculty, to the most senior members of a department or discipline. Melding these differing levels of experience, expertise, and working knowledge of the necessary technologies and approaches to form a cohesive team is a task for a core group of organizers who are able to manage disparate personalities and career paths. Understanding the needs of junior versus senior members of such a team involves questions of allocation of credit, openness to ideas from all contributors, and willingness to sometimes push the envelope. 

The rewards both for the participants and for the field as a whole can lead to outcomes with broad impact as movement is made toward solving the initial complex problem. Catalyzing a team’s efforts toward the common goal is not easy, but the results can lead to expanded opportunities for team members as they interact with new collaborators and ideas. 

This course will explore the concept of a team approach to solving a complex problem and help participants to see both how they might fit into such a concept and how they might seek to initiate a team science approach to a complex and unfulfilled problem. 

Activities will include finding and focusing on a complex problem; identifying the expertise needed to address the problem and whether and which disciplines may be needed; and deciding how to identify, recruit, and meld a team of investigators, as well as how to organize the team around the goals set for addressing the problem. The final steps will include how the team can report out its findings.

Audience: Researchers, librarians, faculty/scholars, publishers, and administrators. The instructor’s background is in the natural sciences, though the concepts embodied in the course outline would apply to the physical sciences as well.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

4:00 – 5:30 PM

Wednesday, July 27

4:00 – 5:30 PM

Thursday, July 28

4:00 – 5:30 PM


L12 – The FAIR Principles in the Scholarly Communications Lifecycle

Matthias Liffers, Kathryn Unsworth 

Abstract: This course will focus on FAIR research data management and stewardship practices. It will provide an understanding of FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) data and how it fits into scholarly communication workflows. Participants will learn about the FAIR Data Principles and how they can be implemented with regard for indigenous data sovereignty under the CARE principles.

Good data stewardship is the cornerstone of knowledge, discovery, and innovation in research. The FAIR Data Principles address data creators, stewards, software engineers, publishers, and others to promote maximum use of research data. In research libraries, the principles can be used as a framework for fostering and extending research data services.

This course will provide an overview of the FAIR Data Principles and the drivers behind their development by a broad community of international stakeholders. We will explore a range of topics related to implementing FAIR principles, including how and where data can be described, stored, and made discoverable (e.g., data repositories, metadata); methods for identifying and citing data; interoperability of (meta)data; and tips for enabling data reuse (e.g., data licensing) with best-practice examples. Along the way, we will get hands-on with data and tools through self-paced exercises. There will be opportunities for participants to learn from each other and to develop skills in data management and expertise in making data FAIR.

The course will conclude with a look at applying the FAIR principles beyond data, such as vocabularies, platforms, software, and training materials.

Audience: Researchers, librarians, faculty/scholars, publishers, administrators, technical support staff, and research infrastructure project teams.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

5:00 – 6:00 PM

Wednesday, July 27

5:00 – 6:00 PM

Thursday, July 28

5:00 – 6:00 PM


L13 – Using the ORCID, Sherpa Romeo, and Unpaywall APIs in R to Harvest Institutional Data

Clarke Iakovakis, Kay Bjornen, Brandon Katzir, Megan Macken 

Abstract: The objectives of this course are to obtain a set of ORCID iDs for people affiliated with your institution, harvest a list of DOIs for publications associated with these iDs, and gather open access information for the articles using Sherpa Romeo and Unpaywall. 

Students will work with a set of pre-written scripts in R, customizing them for their institutions to access the APIs for ORCID, Sherpa Romeo, and Unpaywall, and bring it all together into a manageable data file. 

While some experience using R will be helpful, it is not required. However, although the basics of using R and understanding the code will be reviewed, the emphasis of the course will be on running the scripts and gathering and interpreting the data. In other words, this course is focused not on learning R, but rather on obtaining a dataset of publications based on institutional affiliation and open access information on those publications. It is inspired by a course taught previously at FSCI, available at https://osf.io/vpgbt/. The course will conclude with a discussion of using this data to develop outreach methods to authors to inform them of their right to deposit author manuscripts.

Audience: The course will be useful for repository managers, research information management system (RIMS) administrators, librarians, funders, publishers, and others who need to systematically gather publication and open access data.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

4:00 – 6:00 PM

Wednesday, July 27

4:00 – 6:00 PM

Thursday, July 28

4:00 – 6:00 PM


L14 – Introduction to Data Curation Using Ontologies: FAIR Datasets and Community Collaboration

Rhiannon Cameron, Damion Dooley, Emma Griffiths, William Hsiao, Anoosha Sehar

Abstract: The ways in which people encode meaning into text are complex. It is difficult to know for sure what one means without additional context. Semantic ambiguity can impede the sharing of knowledge and impact the comparability and interoperability of datasets. 

This course covers how we can use ontologies to improve the consistency and communication of ideas. Ontologies are data structures that are composed of controlled vocabularies, and the relations between them, that represent a piece of knowledge in a subject area. They are being used to support a variety of academic research, government, and commercial projects by providing findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR) data annotations that computers can reason over. 

This is a course not on how to develop an ontology, nor on the underlying data models, but rather on how a data curator can engage in ontology practices to support their FAIR data objectives. Over three sessions we will cover what ontologies are, how to access and explore ontologies, finding and evaluating appropriate ontology terms, annotating spreadsheet data, and how to make new term requests. 

We will introduce users to the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) foundry community and their founding principles, as well as explore practical examples and applications using the Genomic Epidemiology Ontology (GenEpiO) and the Food Ontology (FoodOn). That being said, this course is not limited to individuals who work within genomic and epidemiological frameworks – our aim is to support users in solving practical data-quality problems using open access ontologies across disciplines.

Several free and/or open-source tools will be introduced throughout the course, including but not limited to: Ontobee, EMBL-EBI Ontology Lookup Service, Protégé, and OntoMaton.

Audience: Researchers, data curators.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific UTC-7)

Tuesday, July 26

4:00 – 5:00 PM

Wednesday, July 27

4:00 – 5:00 PM

Thursday, July 28

4:00 – 5:00 PM

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